Quotes from Jane Austen-Inspired Books

Welcome to my page of quotations from books inspired by Jane Austen and her novels. I didn’t realize how many of these exist — hundreds! Here are little quotings from just a few. –ღTerri

But love knows not reason. And Jane did not care what consequences might ensue. For, in her mind, the risks she was taking to meet with her new-found lover tonight were as nothing compared to the dread she felt, of slipping into her old age without ever having tasted love. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

If this were a Jane Austen novel, one of the women would come up with a clever idea. ~Laurie Brown, What Would Jane Austen Do?, 2009

She came to the edge of the woods, which bounded a broad meadow. Covered now in swirls of mist frosted by the light of a near-full moon, the grassy field had taken on an otherworldly look, like one of the fairy-tale landscapes she was forever imagining in her dreams. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

If only words were capable of beheading a zombie… I would presently find myself in the company of the world’s two greatest warriors. ~Seth Grahame-Smith, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, 2009

Gently he took her chin in his hand, and caressing her lovely face, he grew giddy from the scent of roses in her hair as they kissed in the waning light of the moon. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

He went to the medicine closet in the bathroom, took some painkiller, and went to lie down on the bed until his head felt better. If only there were something as simple he could take for the ache in his soul. ~Abigail Reynolds, Pemberley by the Sea: A Modern Love Story, Pride and Prejudice Style, 2008

The study had two leather reading chairs and dark-stained oak bookcases that lined three walls. Frank would dearly have loved to sit down with a stack of books; but the chairs were occupied, and his own parents and Emma had made it clear to him that reading at parties was not done. He decided he had best return to the hall, out of the way of temptation. ~Ray Smith, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 1999  [a little altered –tg]

The only consolation in foul weather is to turn one’s lock upon the street, and settle in by the fire with tea and a good book… ~Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Man of the Cloth: Being the Second Jane Austen Mystery, 1997

Twilight obscured the house behind the trees, but the several lighted windows suggested warmth and comfort. ~Ray Smith, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 1999

It’s just not possible to fall into 1810 and end up in the woods with Jane Austen. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

Of course, she fully realized, going to meet him like this was madness. But then, she reminded herself, madness had been the hallmark of their brief but intense relationship, a relationship that had been doomed from the start. For she could not go with him and he could not stay. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

Mr. Darcy had a considerably larger head, and thus, more brains to feast upon. ~Seth Grahame-Smith, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, 2009

The combination of fatigue, stress, and whatever was in that energy bar had obviously sent her imagination into overdrive. ~Laurie Brown, What Would Jane Austen Do?, 2009

Tasting the briny sea air blowing in off the Sound… cleansed her of the grime of the past. ~Abigail Reynolds, Pemberley by the Sea: A Modern Love Story, Pride and Prejudice Style, 2008

The air between us seemed to crackle with contained emotion. ~Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Man of the Cloth: Being the Second Jane Austen Mystery, 1997

A sudden silence gripped the table, marked only by the slightest cough from Captain Fielding. If a cough could be declared ironic, then his was the very soul of irony. ~Stephanie Barron, Jane and the Man of the Cloth: Being the Second Jane Austen Mystery, 1997

Amateur drunks are the curse of New Year’s Eve parties. ~Ray Smith, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 1999

Most experts agree that Jane was the ultimate hopeless romantic. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006

I find the swift and shining modern world that you’ve described nearly impossible to envision. It is like the telling of a dream… Astonishing! The feminine spirit freed. ~Sally Smith O’Rourke, The Man Who Loved Jane Austen, 2006