Poetry Quotes: Flowers

A good poem, like a bouquet of choice flowers, is the blending of exquisite coloring and sweet perfume, to the delight of both head and heart. ~James Lendall Basford (1845–1915), “Pulpit, Pen, and Platform,” Sparks from the Philosopher’s Stone, 1882

There is as much difference between good poetry and fine verses, as between the smell of a flower-garden and of a perfumer’s shop. ~Augustus William Hare and Julius Charles Hare, Guesses at Truth, by Two Brothers, 1827

Poetry is an ethereal garden crying rhyming tears of roses. ~Terri Guillemets, “Fairie aerial,” 1997

Being perfect artists and ingenuous poets, the Chinese have piously preserved the love and holy cult of flowers; one of the very rare and most ancient traditions which has survived their decadence. And since flowers had to be distinguished from each other, they have attributed graceful analogies to them, dreamy images, pure and passionate names which perpetuate and harmonize in our minds the sensations of gentle charm and violent intoxication with which they inspire us. So it is that certain peonies, their favorite flower, are saluted by the Chinese, according to their form or color, by these delicious names, each an entire poem and an entire novel: The Young Girl Who Offers Her Breasts, or: The Water That Sleeps Beneath the Moon, or: The Sunlight in the Forest, or: The First Desire of the Reclining Virgin, or: My Gown Is No Longer All White Because in Tearing It the Son of Heaven Left a Little Rosy Stain; or, even better, this one: I Possessed My Lover in the Garden. ~Octave Mirbeau, Torture Garden

We should manage our Thoughts in composing a Poem, as Shepherds do their Flowers in making a Garland; first select the choicest, and then dispose them in the most proper Places, where they give a Lustre to each other… ~Alexander Pope, “Thoughts on Various Subjects,” 1727

Her poetry cries crimson roses
and laughs in spritely daisies.
~Terri Guillemets