Quotes about Scorpius Constellation

Welcome to my page of quotations about the constellation Scorpius. Enjoy! –Terri ღ

A Star Professor at the big college in New York taught us the Scorpion. I really think it looks like a Scorpion, with its tail curled over its back. He says a good way to find Scorpio is to face south, and the handle of the Dipper points to it. But if you face south, you can hardly miss it, as An-tá-res, the Scorpion’s heart, is so very bright and red, and bright green, too. It is a funny color, but very pretty. ~Gertrude Chandler Warner, Star Stories for Little Folks, 1918

Whiles Scorpio, dreading Sagittarius‘ dart
Whose bow prest bent in flight, the string had slipp’d,
Down slid into the Ocean flood apart,
The Bear, that in the Irish seas had dipp’d
His grisly feet, with speed from thence he whipp’d…
~Thomas Sackville, “The Induction,” Mirour for Magistrates, 1563

There is a place above, where Scorpio bent,
In tail and arms surrounds a vast extent;
In a wide circuit of the heavens he shines,
And fills the place of two celestial signs.
~Ovid

Scorpio is one of the most ancient of the constellations, originally much extended in the direction of Virgo, the claws of the Scorpion occupying the region of the sky where we now see the constellation Libra. ~William Tyler Olcott, “Scorpio, The Scorpion,” Star Lore of All Ages, 1911

Scorpio is in a region of the heavens famous for the appearance of novæ, the wonderful temporary stars that occasionally flash upon our view the light that spells a great conflagration or mighty cataclysm far out in space, the enormity of which is beyond our comprehension. ~William Tyler Olcott, “Scorpio, The Scorpion,” Star Lore of All Ages, 1911

Scorpio is a very beautiful group of stars, and easily traced out in the heavens. It furnishes striking evidence of the facility with which most of the constellations may be so accurately delineated, as to preclude every thing like uncertainty in the knowledge of their relative situation. ~Elijah H. Burritt, The Geography of the Heavens, 1833

The Akkadians called Scorpio “the Seizer” or “Stinger.” ~Richard Hinckley Allen, Star-Names and Their Meanings, 1899

Scorpius is not a scorpion to everyone. The Javanese people of Indonesia call this constellation Banyakangrem, meaning “the brooded swan” or Kalapa Doyong, meaning “leaning coconut tree.” In Hawaii, it is known as the demigod Maui’s Fishhook. In Chinese mythology, the constellation was part of the Azure Dragon. ~Kim Ann Zimmermann, “Scorpius Constellation: Facts About the Scorpion,” 2017 May 16th

The Scorpius constellation lies in the southern sky, one of the oldest constellations catalogued. Located near the centre of the Milky Way, it contains a number of notable stars and deep sky objects, including the bright stars Antares and Shaula, the Butterfly Cluster, Ptolemy Cluster, Cat’s Paw Nebula, Butterfly Nebula, and the War and Peace Nebula. Scorpius contains 55 stars, including 13 stars with known planets as well as the Alpha Scorpiids and Omega Scorpiids meteor showers. In ancient times, the constellation was significantly larger and comprised of two halves, one with the scorpion’s body and sting, and one containing the claws. The latter was called Chelae and was separated into the Libra constellation, or the Scales. ~Constellation-Guide.com