Quotes about Slumber Parties

Welcome to my page of quotations about slumber parties, a.k.a. sleepovers or pajama parties. I’ve got so many good school-age memories of overnight parties with friends. We would giggle and tell scary stories, play truth or dare, eat ice cream, and — at junior high school age — freeze the bra of the first girl to fall asleep, and other hijinks. What a blast! And now even in my middle age, my mom and I still have the occasional slumber party and watch old movies and drink hot cocoa. I just can’t keep my eyes open much past 10 p.m. anymore! –ღTerri

Slumber parties are inevitable, like death and income taxes. The only way to avoid them is not to have a teenage daughter… And not having room in the house for a slumber party is NO excuse. They use wall to wall sleeping bags and can squeeze, with ease, twenty girls in one 9 by 12 bedroom. They sandwich transistor radios between the sleeping bags, all tuned to a different station, and manage to carry on a giggling conversation simultaneously. The only way to quiet them down before 4 a.m. would be to spray them with ether — a procedure frowned upon by the A.M.A., regretfully. ~Paul Storm, 1967

The slumber-party girls sprawl on the… floor whispering, giggling, gossiping, but not sleeping. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (California schoolgirls), Life, 1944 December 4th

The slumber party is an old and honored tradition among girls in their teens. It answers the need for gregarious interchange of ideas and gossip in the intimate setting of the boudoir. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (Indianapolis club), Life, 1943 January 4th

That was where friendships were smelted from unrefined ore into pure metal: two girls staying up past their bedtime, painting one another’s nails, trying on one another’s clothes, wondering about ghosts, confiding secrets, swapping tokens of undying affection, hours of whispering in the darkness. ~Abby Geni, The Wildlands, 2018

How little sleep one got at a slumber party is a matter of great pride and an index of the success of the party. ~Elizabeth Radin Simons, The Slumber Party as Folk Ritual, 1980

Slumber parties are our favorite. We stay up much later than our parents know, whispering under tents that we make with bedcovers. We use flashlights from summer camp and talk ourselves to sleep in the wee hours. ~Royanne Boyer, Secrets of the Seven, 2012 [a little altered –tg]

In case your daughter isn’t yet 6-, 7- or even 10-years old, I feel I should prepare you for something that’s as popular and as nerve-racking as the skateboard: It’s the slumber party… They spread quilts on the floor, all 20 of them, on a hot summer night… Now, slumber parties are a social phenomenon or maybe a sport. Some behaviorists think their resurgence came in with the sale of these cutesy sleeping bags for tiny tots… These new bags zip up, but they don’t cover the head area and so they don’t hold in the noise… absolutely no acoustical control. ~Elise Townsend Chisolm (1924–2008), “No Rest for the Weary Mom,” Are We There Yet? A Collection of Baltimore Sun Columns from 1974–1999

Raiding the icebox is a necessary preliminary to retiring at any slumber party. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (Indianapolis club), Life, 1943 January 4th

At slumber parties girls talk, eat and jitterbug. When there is nothing else for them to do, they sleep. ~“Sub-Deb Clubs,” Life, 1945 April 2nd

I’m not sure it is a healthy past time. These kids who aren’t getting enough sleep are the future of this country… What if they grow up incurable insomniacs? ~Elise Townsend Chisolm (1924–2008), “No Rest for the Weary Mom,” Are We There Yet? A Collection of Baltimore Sun Columns from 1974–1999

A slumber party is the ultimate time to catch up with your girls and get your nails looking glossy! ~Bratz Stylin’ Slumber Party!, 2003, Grosset & Dunlap, MGA Entertainment

As everyone knows, although no one knows quite why, young girls like to sleep at one another’s homes. This peculiarity sometimes manifests itself in something called a “slumber party,” in which numbers of girls in nightdress stretch out on somebody’s parlor floor to drink hot cocoa, talk about boys, giggle, throw pillows, tell ghost stories and otherwise work themselves into a state of adolescent hysteria that forfends sleep. They feel terrible the next morning. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (California schoolgirls), Life, 1944 December 4th

Showers of feathers bring the pillow fight to a suitable finish. The hour is 3 o’clock. Necessary repairs to face and hair are made, and a final gesture toward going to bed. School doesn’t keep tomorrow, and there will be plenty of time to assemble scattered feathers after the hostess’ mother has regaled club members with a late breakfast. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (Indianapolis club), Life, 1943 January 4th

Pleasant excitement occurred when members of the football team eluded night watchmen and scaled the walls. No slumber party is a real success without marauding boys. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (California schoolgirls), Life, 1944 December 4th

It’s time for a slumber party, girls! There’s no better place to try on new make‑up, show off the latest looks and talk about cute boys all night long! ~Bratz Stylin’ Slumber Party!, 2003, Grosset & Dunlap, MGA Entertainment

Forget a sensible dinner; slumber parties are all about the snack attack. ~Jennifer Traig, Crafty Girl: Slumber Parties, 2002

At 3 a.m. the girls settle down after raiding the kitchen. They talk drowsily and nibble candy. For the most part they don’t bother with their usual nightly beauty routines. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (California schoolgirls), Life, 1944 December 4th [a little altered –tg]

Overnights and slumber parties are delectable staples in a teenage girl’s entertainment diet. ~McCall’s, October 1977 [a little altered –tg]

You can throw a slumber party just because you want to hang out with all your best girls. But if you’re feeling ambitious, your PJ party can also have a theme. The theme can be as simple as a birthday celebration or a fashion show, or even something really wacky, like a fortune-telling party. ~Bratz Stylin’ Slumber Party!, 2003, Grosset & Dunlap, MGA Entertainment

The slumber party is a composite occasion of practically all of the folk genres associated with childhood and adolescence. Staying up late, delving into occult practices, playing pranks — these are all elements of the slumber party, and each can be traced back many years and even centuries. But as the sum of its parts, the slumber party as we know it today is a product of the twentieth century. ~Julia Woodbridge Oxrieder, “The Slumber Party: Transition into Adolescence,” 1977

I like to party, and by party I mean a slumber party for one with plenty of books to read. ~WritersWrite.co.za

Note the accepted dress for slumber parties includes flannel nightgowns, plain and flowered, and silk pajamas. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (Indianapolis club), Life, 1943 January 4th

Fireside chat, subdeb style, is informal and concerns nothing more serious than such topics as future parties and current beaux. ~“Life Goes to a Slumber Party” (Indianapolis club), Life, 1943 January 4th

A social custom, at slumber parties several young females stay up late at night, discuss school, boys, and parents, tell jokes, sing songs, play pranks, have pillow fights, tell ghost stories, and even have séances. ~Robert A. Georges and Michael Owens Jones, “Folklore and Human Psychology,” Folkloristics: An Introduction, 1995 [a little altered –tg]

Slumber parties for young girls are the rage by the time they are eight or nine years old. Similar events involving the fellows are typically called “sleepovers.” Boys get together and camp out in backyards or nearby lakeshores. ~William Lynwood Montell, “Times Just Aren’t the Way They Used to Be: Folklife of Contemporary Youth,” Upper Cumberland Country, 1993 [a little altered –tg]

Not so long ago, sleepovers for girls meant braiding one another’s hair and telephoning their crushes late at night. But… propelled by changing mores, insistent teens and indulgent parents, the slumber party, once a treasured rite of passage for girls, is increasingly going coeducational… The trend, which has been big on both coasts for a while, is marching steadily through the heartland. ~Christina Duff, Wall Street Journal, 1995