The Quote Garden
 “I dig old books.”
 Est. 1998



     

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Terri's Lists of
Quotation Awesomeness,
Trivia, and Miscellany


Related Quotes      Brevity      Books      Libraries      Language      Writing


I am just so excited I can barely contain myself. This page has been a very long time in the making (30 years), and I've finally decided to put it all together. Be warned please that it is still *way* UNDER CONSTRUCTION so there's lots more coming over the next several months — just putting it up one draft portion at a time. Haven't proofread it yet or anything. Ahem, enough with the temporary disclaimer. To begin the real introduction: I don't just love quotations themselves and digging for them; over the years I've also developed quite a passion for information related to quotes and the entire quotation collecting field/genre. I wanted a place to put all those things, and this is that page. A bit of this is from Willis Goth Regier's Quotology — thank you, Sir! — as well as books and articles from other quotation experts, but most of it is just stuff I've scribbled down over the past three decades as I came across it. It's not an academically written history by any means, just a list of stuff I find to be cool and don't want to forget, some of it listed as a single word only, some of it the awesome words of other collectors and anthologists, etc. And if you're interested in this type of thing — i.e., anything in the world of quotations — you might also want to check out my glossary of quotation-, literary-, and book-related words and my page of quotations about quotations, as well as my "Quotatious & Literary" Pinterest board and my 'quotations'-tagged blog posts. There is also a section of other Quotation Resources on my Links page. And I'm still learning about the field, trying to become a true expert, so I'll keep adding here as I find more quotation awesomeness through the years. Enjoy! —tεᖇᖇ¡·g, October 2014



Quotation Anthologies: Interesting Words, Quotes, Synonyms, Descriptions, and Titles

  • collections
  • compilations
  • treasury, treasuries
  • dictionary, dictionaries
  • thesauri (Latin)
  • ratnakoshās (Sanskrit)
  • "orient pearls at random strung" (John T. Watson quoting Ḥāfeẓ describing his Poetical Quotations in its 1847 Preface)  [However, according to Franklin D. Lewis, that phrase does not appear in the original Persian text of Ḥāfeẓ' poem; William Jones took poetic license by adding it while translating the poem in the 1700s, introducing "to the new world a species of literature which abounds with so many new expressions, new images and new inventions." —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]
  • florilegia (books of flowers), florilegium, bouquet of flowers, variegated bouquet, flowers of intellect  "Many there be that turn aside from the crowded mart and the busy workshop, the counting-house and the factory, into some quiet nook, where 'The inner spirit keepeth holiday/Like vernal ground to sabbath sunshine left,' there to delight themselves with the beauties of some favourite author—to walk with Poesy in her serene retreats, and to indulge in those 'sweet pleasures' that 'to verse belong;' but there are yet more who would gladly do this, were they not 'chained to the desk, the world's unwilling slaves,' or in some other way so fully engaged in working out the great problem of life, and satisfying 'That sad necessity for bread and cheese' which none of us can escape, that they are quite unable to do so. To such as these we offer, with some confidence, and with no little sympathy, our collection of choice flowers, culled from the gardens of Poesy: may they refresh the mind, and gladden the heart, and beautify the path, of many a careworn toiler in the fields of labour, of whatsoever kind." ~H.G. Adams, Preface to A Cyclopædia of Poetical Quotations; Consisting of Choice Passages from The Poets of Every Age and Country, Classified under Distinct Heads, and Alphabetically Arranged for Ready Reference with a Copious Index of Subjects and Authors' Names, 1853
  • quotation miscellanies
  • bibliotheca
  • gnomology, gnomologies
  • tricks of phrase
  • the Saturnalia of Macrobius (early 5th century) is a quotation collection composed as dinner and breakfast conversations of a dozen learned men
  • literary storehouse
  • miscellany of notes
  • commonplace books
  • Silva rerum (forest of things) — home chronicle, Polish, a multi-generational chronicle; It was added to by many generations, and contained various information: diary-type entries on current events, memoirs, letters, political speeches, copies of legal documents, gossips, jokes and anecdotes, financial documents, economic information (price of grain, etc.), philosophical musings, poems, genealogical trees, advice (agricultural, medical, moral) for the descendants and others - the wealth of information in silva is staggering, they contain anything that their authors wished to record for future generations. {wikipedia}
  • works of reference
  • meditations
  • rerum memorandarum libri (books of memorable things)
  • apophthegmata
  • laconic
  • borrowings
  • compendium, compendia
  • reservoir
  • concordance
  • anthology, anthologies
  • corpus
  • analects
  • quotationary
  • Gleanings for the Curious from the Harvest-Fields of Literature: A Melange of Excerpta, Collated by C.C. Bombaugh (c.1860)
  • paræmiography, paroemiography, paremiography (the study of the collection and writing of proverbs; a sub-field of paremiology, the study of proverbs)
  • desiderata (desired things, objects of desire, things wanted or needed; the plural of desideratum)  "Such a book, then, would seem to be a desideratum, which we have undertaken to supply, in a form at once elegant, cheap, and portable—a volume which, while it will be an ornament to the Library shelves or the Drawing-room table, may be carried without inconvenience in the hand or the pocket of the Pedestrian, or the Railway Traveller, and serve to heighten his enjoyment of the beauties of Nature, by associating with them those of the Mind and the Imagination; or to beguile the tedium of an otherwise dull journey, by storing the memory with the noble and exalted thoughts—truly "thoughts that breathe," embodied in "words that burn,"—which we have taken the pains to collect for his pleasure and edification." ~H.G. Adams, Preface to A Cyclopædia of Poetical Quotations; Consisting of Choice Passages from The Poets of Every Age and Country, Classified under Distinct Heads, and Alphabetically Arranged for Ready Reference with a Copious Index of Subjects and Authors' Names, 1853
  • "We do not... present to our readers 'a mingle-mangle,' and hope to be excused 'because the whole world has become a hotch-potch,' but a carefully-selected, digested, and arranged book of Poetical Quotations, each of them embodying a sentiment, enforcing a moral, illustrating a point of character, or a position in life, or describing a mental or physical beauty or deformity, for admiration, or reprobation, or pity, or sympathy, as the case may be." ~H.G. Adams, Preface to A Cyclopædia of Poetical Quotations; Consisting of Choice Passages from The Poets of Every Age and Country, Classified under Distinct Heads, and Alphabetically Arranged for Ready Reference with a Copious Index of Subjects and Authors' Names, 1853
  • paremiography: the collection of proverbs
  • paremiology: the study of proverbs
  • "thoughts of quotation both antique and fresh"
  • ephemera
  • International Bibliography of Paremiography: Collections of Proverbs, Proverbial Expressions and Comparisons, Quotations, Graffiti, Slang, and Wellerisms, Wolfgang Mieder, Proverbium, 2011
  • facetia, facetiae
  • -ana (suffix) collection of materials about a given subject or person
  • "Erasmus (1466–1536) published three widely reprinted and much used commonplace books... The quotations, adages, proverbs, brief narratives, excerpts, anecdotes, compiler comments, etc. broke down the whole of classical antiquity into bite-size snippets of sayings that could be introduced into discourse either in whole or paraphrased." ~Bill Katz, "Commonplace Books to Books of Quotations," Cuneiform to Computer: A History of Reference Sources, 1998
  • "The first book of quotations to gain wide circulation in the Renaissance was Dominicus Mirabellius's Polyanthea, published in 1503. It consisted of an alphabetically arranged dictionary of Latin quotations." ~Bill Katz, "Commonplace Books to Books of Quotations," Cuneiform to Computer: A History of Reference Sources, 1998
  • "Montaigne (1533–1592) took up the classical quotations, as well as those from the Medieval and Renaissance periods, and wove them into his Essays... which became the model for not only the digressive essay, but also the clever use of quotations to make and support points." ~Bill Katz, "Commonplace Books to Books of Quotations," Cuneiform to Computer: A History of Reference Sources, 1998
  • "Paralleling the emphasis on quotes was an equal concern with memory. The ability to learn and casually drop a quote was seen as important for both writing and conversation from the early Greeks through much of the nineteenth century." ~Bill Katz, "Commonplace Books to Books of Quotations," Cuneiform to Computer: A History of Reference Sources, 1998
  • "Many moons ago dictionaries of quotations may have been less needed than they are today. In those good/bad old days, people walked around with entire poems and all the Shakespearean soliloquies in their heads." ~Joseph Epstein, "Foreword: The Art of Quotation" to Fred Shapiro's The Yale Book of Quotations"
  • "The one promise of the digital data base is that eventually all quotations will be available online.... The problems are numerous, from copyright clearance to authentication of quotations, but it is possible, even probable that in a short time it will no longer be necessary to go from quotation book to quotation book in quest of the lost words of a great or near great. A few key words at a computer keyboard will bring the ubiquitous needle in the quotation haystack to the monitor. Obviously more efficient; yet something will be lost. Gone will be the days of the delights of wending through quote after quote, the thoughtful pause, the joy of discovery." ~Bill Katz, "Commonplace Books to Books of Quotations," Cuneiform to Computer: A History of Reference Sources, 1998  [How fascinating the accuracy of Katz's prediction! And how true, for most people, that the delight of browsing is gone. The year he published this book is the same year I put The Quote Garden online, coincidentally. —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]
  • "The ways of quotation collectors are strange, we know..." ~Wilson Library Bulletin, Volume 24, 1949
  • Forty Thousand Sublime and Beautiful Thoughts Gathered from the Roses, Clover Blossoms, Geraniums, Violets, Morning-glories, and Pansies of Literature: Fourteen Hundred Subjects, Embracing Every Topic that Stirs the Human Heart or Engages the Human Mind; from the Most Famous Authors of Ancient and Modern Times, and Other Sources, compiled by Charles Noel Douglas, 1904
  • A Complete Dictionary of Poetical Quotations: Comprising the Most Excellent and Appropriate Passages in the Old British Poets; with Choice and Copious Selections from the Best Modern British and American Poets, Beautifully Illustrated with Engravings edited by Sarah Josepha Hale, 1849
  • A Cyclopædia of Sacred Poetical Quotations; Consisting of Choice Passages from the Sacred Poetry of All Ages and Countries, Classified and Arranged, for Facility of Reference, Under Subject Headings; Illustrated by Striking Passages from Scripture, and Forming Altogether A Complete Book of Devotional Poetry edited by H.G. Adams, 1854
  • A Dictionary of Poetical Illustrations, Specially Selected with a View to the Needs of the Pulpit and Platform, by the Rev. R.A. Bertram, 1877
  • A Dictionary of Thoughts, Being A Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors, Both Ancient and Modern, Alphabetically Arranged by Subjects, by Tryon Edwards, D.D., 1891
  • A Literary Manual of Foreign Quotations Ancient and Modern with Illustrations from American and English Authors and Explanatory Notes, compiled by John Devoe Belton, 1890
  • Jewels Gathered from Painter & Poet, 1865
  • A Thousand Flashes of French Wit, Wisdom, and Wickedness, collected and translated by J. De Finod, 1880
  • A Catalogue of Books of Proverbs, Sayings, Maxims, Apophthegms, Adages, and Similitudes, By Ancient, Intermediate, and Modern Authors (Gowans, 1851)
  • Each number will present a page of "Apples of Gold," plucked with the utmost care, from the most famous trees. ~"Editorial," Common School Education: Devoted to the Art of Instruction, William A. Mowry, ed., January 1887
  • A Year of Sunshine: Cheerful Extracts for Every Day in the Year, selected and arranged by Kate Sanborn, 1886
  • The Wild Garland: or, Curiosities of Poetry, containing the most quaint and curious specimens of Rare, Ancient, and Modern Rhymes, Inscriptions, Epigrams, Epitaphs, Ballads, Carols, Songs, Poems, &c., existing in the English Language; interspersed with Notes and Anecdotes, each division being metaphorically represented by a Wild Flower, introduced by a popular and concise Essay. The whole selected, arranged, and classified by Isaac J. Reeve.
  • 1,001 logical laws, accurate axioms, profound principles, trusty truisms, homey homilies, colorful corollaries, quotable quotes, and rambunctious ruminations for all walks of life, John Peers, Gordon Bennett, George Booth, 1979
  • Attic Salt: or, Epigrammatic Sayings Healthful, Humourous, and Wise in Prose and Verse, Collected from the Works of Mortimer Collins by Frank Kerslake, 1880
  • Rays of Genius Collected to Enlighten the Rising Generation
  • Books and My Food: Original Recipes with Literary Quotations for Every Day in the Year by Elisabeth Luther Cary and Annie M. Jones, 1906
  • Borrowings: A Compilation of Helpful Thoughts from Great Authors, 1891
  • Curiosities in Proverbs: A Collection of Unusual Adages, Maxims, Aphorisms, Phrases and Other Popular Dicta from Many Lands, classified and arranged with annotations by Dwight Edwards Marvin, 1916
  • Day's Collacon: An Encyclopædia of Prose Quotations, Consisting of Beautiful Thoughts, Choice Extracts, and Sayings, of the Most Eminent Writers of All Nations, from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time, Together with a Comprehensive Biographical Index of Authors, and an Alphabetical List of Subjects Quoted, compiled and arranged by Edward Parsons Day, 1884
  • Diamonds from Brilliant Minds, Gems of Poesy, Quotations and Proverbs, Interspersed with Valuable Information Relating to the Manners and Tone of Good Society, edited by Mr. George D. Carroll, 1881
  • Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers: A Cyclopædia of Quotations from the Literature of All Ages Designed for the use of the Senate, the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Orator, by Josiah H. Gilbert, 1895
  • In & Out of Book and Journal by A. Sydney Roberts, 1890
  • Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources including Phrases, Mottoes, Maxims, Proverbs, Definitions, Aphorisms, and Sayings of Wise Men, in their Bearing on Life, Literature, Speculation, Science, Art, Religion, and Morals, Especially in the Modern Aspects of Them, selected and compiled by the Rev. James Wood, 1899
  • Edge-Tools of Speech selected and arranged by Maturin M. Ballou, 1899 (based on a Bacon quote with that phrase)
  • Golden Gleams of Thought from the Words of Leading Orators, Divines, Philosophers, Statesmen and Poets by Rev. S.P. Linn, 1909
  • Many Thoughts of Many Minds: A Treasury of Quotations from the Literature of Every Land and Every Age compiled by Louis Klopsch, 1896
  • The Tablets of the Heart: Poems, Rhymes, and Aphorisms, Domestic, Social, Complimentary, and Amatory selected and arranged by the Rev. Frederick Langbridge, M.A., 1883
  • Two Thousand Sublime and Beautiful Thoughts: A Storehouse of Memorable Utterances by Master Minds compiled by James Clarence Harvey
  • Can I Sit on Your Lap While You're Pooping?: Actual Quotes from an Actual Toddler to Her Actual Dad by Matthew Carroll (& Morgan), 2016
  • Wise Sayings of the Great and Good, 1864
  • Many of the selections in this volume are waifs and strays, found in obscure periodicals and newspapers, or in long-forgotten books on the dusty shelves of libraries. ~Willis Boyd Allen, "The Violet Book," 1909
  • Excellent salads, according to parson Adams, are to be found in every field; we have garnered from the fertile fields of literature. Should any one be curious to know why we have ventured to select Salad, for the entertainment of the reader, we beg to premise that it has an undoubted preference over a rich ragout, fricassee, or any other celebrated product of culinary art, from the fact that it is suitable to all seasons, as well as all sorts of persons, being a delectable conglomerate of good things,—meats, vegetables,—acids and sweets,—oils, sauces, and other condiments too numerous to detail.... There is a Spanish proverb which insists that four persons are indispensable to the production of a good salad,—a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a counsellor for salt, and a madman to stir it all up. ¶ Our Salad—a consarcination of many good things for the literary palate... will, it is hoped, felicitate the fancy, and prove an antidote to ennui, or any tendency to senescent foreboding, should such mental malady chance ever to haunt the seclusion of the solitary. An agreeable book, in intervals of leisure and retirement, is sometimes most acceptable company; the present work may possibly prove thus available.... ¶ The contents of this volume are not only various in kind,—variety may also be said to characterize its treatment, which has been attempted somewhat philosophically, poetically, ethically, satirically, critically, hypothetically, æsthetically, hyperbolically, psychologically, metaphysically, humorously—and, since brevity is the soul of wit, sententiously. ¶ Having assumed so much adjectively on behalf of the book, nothing need be added respecting its adjunctive—the compiler; an old poet has, however, portrayed him with such singular fidelity, that we herewith present the effigy to the scrutiny of the reader: "A votary of the desk,—a notched and cropped scrivener,—one that sucks his sustenance, as certain sick people are said to do—through a quill." ~Frederic Saunders, "A Word Preliminary," Salad for the Solitary (By an Epicure), 1854 [not a quotation anthology, mostly prose with quotes peppered in (ha!)]


Synonyms & Words Related to Quotation Anthologists, Experts, & Writers
  • compiler
  • quotologist
  • quotographer
  • quotesmith
  • composed to be quoted (La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, Pascal, Colton)
  • witlings
  • quotation lover
  • quoter
  • paroemiographer, paroemiologist, paremiologist
  • phrasedick
  • phrasemeister


Quotation Related Words in Other Languages
  • citiloj (quotes in Esperanto)
  • comiñas (quotes in Galician)
  • le virgolette (quotation marks in Italian)
  • aspas (quotation marks in Portuguese)
  • comillas (quotation marks in Spanish)
  • citattecken (quotation marks in Swedish)


Quotation Collectors, Anthologists, Experts, and Words About Them
  • i.e., quote heroes
  • "Mr. Hoyt did not live to see the completion of the work which had been the object of his absorbing interest and solicitude for so many years." ~K.L. Roberts, 1896, about Jehiel Keeler Hoyt (a.k.a. J.K. Hoyt) and his Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
  • Henry Gardiner Adams (a.k.a. H.G. Adams)
  • Francis Bacon
  • John Bartlett
  • Bibota ("an astute and pseudonymous quotologist" per W.G. Regier)
  • Thomas Brown
  • Clairvaux
  • Charles Caleb Colton (a.k.a. C.C. Colton)
  • Charles Douglas
  • Desiderius Erasmus (in 1500 published Adages and was first to quote himself in a quotation compendium, per W.G. Regier)
  • Bergen Evans
  • Aulus Gellius (Attic Nights, 2nd century)
  • Sarah Josepha Hale
  • John Heywood
  • James Howell
  • Garson O'Toole, The Quote Investigator - quoteinvestigator.com
  • Samuel Johnson
  • Justin Kaplan
  • Elizabeth Knowles
  • H.L. Mencken
  • Michel de Montaigne
  • Photius (gathered his quotations under author names, per W.G. Regier)
  • John Ray
  • Nigel Rees
  • Peter Mark Roget (1779–1869) was a British physician, natural theologian and lexicographer. He is best known for publishing, in 1852, the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (Roget's Thesaurus), a classified collection of related words. Roget was born in London. His obsession with list-making as a coping mechanism was well established by the time he was eight years old. The first printed edition of the thesaurus, in 1852, was called Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases Classified and Arranged so as to Facilitate the Expression of Ideas and Assist in Literary Composition. After his death it was revised and expanded by his son, John Lewis Roget (1828–1908), and later by John's son, Samuel Romilly Roget (b.1875). [Wikipedia] Cool! the 1854 American version of Roget's thesaurus, view for free at Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=jKEVAAAAYAAJ
  • Len Safire
  • James Simpson
  • Jeanne Smith
  • Fred Shapiro
  • Robert I. Fitzhenry (1918–2008)
  • Wolfgang Mieder (international paremiologist) Prof. Mieder, University of Vermont, has special expertise in the areas of German and international folklore, the history of the German language, the Middle Ages, and especially the study of proverbs. Since 1984 he has been the editor of Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship, an annual book that is published by the University of Vermont with subscriptions from around the world. Proverbs Are Never Out of Season: Popular Wisdom in the Modern Age. "Proverbs Speak Louder than Words": Folk Wisdom in Art, Culture, Folklore, History, Literature, and Mass Media.
  • Henry Southgate
  • "Bartlett Jere Whiting, a professor emeritus of English at Harvard University who was renowned for his compilations of proverbs and for his classes on Chaucer.... Professor Whiting was a scholar of Middle English whose witty classes on the great early English poet were a fixture of campus life at Harvard for some 40 years. And while generations of graduate and undergraduate students carried away his classroom teachings, his most durable legacy may be the books that reflected the depth of his scholarship in the study of proverbs. Professor Whiting's interest in proverbs was apparent as early as his senior thesis at Harvard. And his first book, published by Harvard in 1934 and reprinted in 1973 by AMS Press, was "Chaucer's Use of Proverbs." Professor Whiting, who was born in 1904, began his education in Northport, where his mother was both his teacher and the superintendent of schools, and continued it in Belfast, where he graduated from high school in 1921 at the top of his class...." ~"Bartlett Jere Whiting, 90, an Authority on Chaucer and Proverbs" by Lawrence Van Gelder, 1995 August 31st, New York Times
  • Stobaeus (organized his quotations in paired antitypes, per W.G. Regier)
  • Thomas of Ireland (arranged his topics in alphabetical order, per W.G. Regier)
  • William S. Walsh
  • Anna Ward
  • John Watson
  • Burton Egbert Stevenson (1872–1962) (Ohio; Princeton) was an American author, anthologist, and librarian. His anthologies: The home book of verse (1912), Poems of American history (1922), Great Americans as seen by the poets (1933), The home book of quotations; classical and modern (1934), The home book of Bible quotations (1949), The home book of proverbs, maxims, and familiar phrases (1959), American history in verse for boys and girls (1960), The home book of modern verse; an extension of the home book of verse; being a selection from American and English poetry of the twentieth century (1960), The home book of great poetry; a treasury of over one thousand favorite poems, Famous single poems and the controversies which have raged around them, The home book of verse for young folks, The home book of Shakespeare quotations; being also a concordance & a glossary of the unique words & phrases in the plays & poems. The most valuable book in my collection (to me personally, not necessarily in dollar value) is my Burton E. Stevenson 1966 Macmillan Book of Proverbs, Maxims, & Famous Phrases. It is 3.5" thick and has 2,957 pages including a 289-page index. It's fully sourced and is the most amazing thing I've seen thus far in the world of quotations!
  • "Emily Morison Beck, the self-described literary archaeologist who edited three editions of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, mining sources from sea chanteys to Shakespeare.... Mrs. Beck brought an august intellectual heritage, an elephantine memory and bristling energy to refining, enlarging and, sometimes, subtracting from a reference book that few libraries are without.In the 13th, 14th and 15th editions, appearing in 1955, 1968 and 1980, Mrs. Beck gradually added feminist voices.... Mrs. Beck's extensive cross-referencing led to many refinements. For example, she traced Kaufman and Hart's ''You Can't Take It With You'' to the ancient Egyptians, the Bible and Theognis, a Greek poet. Emily Marshall Morison was born on Oct. 15, 1915, in Boston, one of four children of Samuel Eliot Morison, the historian, and Elizabeth Greene Shaw. Newsweek noted in 1990 that she gave as much space to quotations from her father as to those from Herodotus and Thucydides.... Her pursuit of the origins of quotations was dogged and often ingenious.... Her helpers on Bartlett's ranged far beyond the academic experts hired by Little, Brown. The organist at her church told her that the correct title of Thomas Grey's poem was ''Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard,'' not ''Elegy in a Country Churchyard,'' as every edition since John Bartlett had claimed. Mrs. Beck corrected the error in the 14th." ~"Emily Morison Beck, 88, Dies; Edited Bartlett's Quotations" by Douglas Martin, 2004 March 31st, New York Times
  • "Both Maris and I were inveterate quotation collectors..." ~Jonathan Carroll, Sleeping in Flame
  • "I suppose I have been wondering since the age of twelve, since that wonderfully enlightening night ages ago, how I would react to the moment when my first child came into the world. I imagined theme music, some tears, a moving but terse statement that would send quotation collectors scurrying. I imagined some apocalyptic pose that would be caught by camera for posterity to remember. I imagined very good lighting." ~John O'Hurley, "The Arrival," Before Your Dog Can Eat Your Homework, First You Have to Do it: Life Lessons from a Wise Old Dog to a Young Boy
  • "Anthony is the Greek work to which the Latin florilegium is a cousin. Both mean 'flower picking or collecting.' The anthology goes back to classical antiquity, regardless of what it may have been labeled over the centuries. Sometimes the contents of a collection were not planned in advance, and in the majority of these situations with entries made over a period of time into a book of blank pages, the result was a commonplace book."
  • "Both art and science come in to play in compiling a quotation dictionary. The art requires the dictionary compiler to be sufficiently attuned to the intensity and the impact of words so that he (or she) 'knows' a great quotation 'when he sees it,' to paraphrase Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart on pornography. Like Emily Dickinson recognizing poetry, the quotation anthologist responds to the verbal quarry with the sense that 'it makes my body so cold no fire can ever warm me.... I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off.'" ~Fred R. Shapiro, "Introduction," The Yale Book of Quotations
  • "Inevitably, a competent tracer of quotations will be given credit for knowing a great deal that he or she does not know." ~Anthony W. Shipps, The Quote Sleuth: A Manual for the Tracer of Lost Quotations, 1990
  • "Solutions that you cannot find sometimes find you. As Pasteur said, however, chance favors only the prepared mind." ~Anthony W. Shipps, The Quote Sleuth: A Manual for the Tracer of Lost Quotations, 1990
  • "To the compilation and classification of the following Extracts much time and labor have been devoted. Still the critical reader will doubtless find many imperfections, both in the plan and execution of the work, which can scarcely be excused by the fact of its having been prepared for the press amidst the continuous and exacting calls of professional studies. But, tedious and even perplexing as the task has often been in its details, on the whole it has proved a labor of love, to collect into one casket what were 'like orient pearls at random strung;' and, such as the book is, the compiler would fain present it to its readers as a variegated bouquet, culled from the many gardens that diversify and adorn the extensive fields of English and American Poetry." ~John T. Watson, Philadelphia, April 1847, Preface, Dictionary of Poetical Quotations; or, Elegant Extracts on every Subject, Compiled from Various Authors, and Arranged under Appropriate Heads
  • [to do: check for duplicates]
  • "One of the world’s top quotation experts, Fred R. Shapiro, editor of the Yale Book of Quotations..."
  • quotation researcher Ken Hirsch
  • invaluable TwainQuotes website of Barbara Schmidt
  • quotation collector Evan Esar
  • quotation expert Ralph Keyes (Quote Verifier) www.ralphkeyes.com
  • quotographer Rosalie Maggio
  • quotemeister Bennett Cerf
  • Colette Moore: professor at University of Washington (English language studies, history of the English language, late medieval literature) "I am interested, most broadly, in the ways that speakers and writers have used and shaped the English language to meet their changing needs. My research is based in the history of the English language, and uses methodology from historical pragmatics, sociolinguistics, and stylistics. My 2011 book, Quoting Speech in Early English, joins linguistic and literary studies to investigate methods of marking reported speech in late medieval English. I am currently researching the intersection of linguistic and scribal strategies for textual organization in the late Middle English devotional texts. Other research and teaching interests include language ideologies, language and community, corpus linguistics, language and gender, the changing linguistic landscape in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and Middle English language and literature." (quote-related publications: "Talking about talk: quethen, quoth, quote," 2015; "Quoting Speech in Early English," 2011)
  • James Geary: aphorism aficionado, metaphor maven, wit wonderer (The World in a Phrase: A Brief History of the Aphorism. Geary’s Guide to the World’s Great Aphorists. "Geary fell in love with aphorisms when, at 8, his eye wandered to the Quotable Quotes section of Reader’s Digest ... His attraction turned into a lifetime obsession..." New York Times — "Probably the definitive work on aphorisms, a love letter-cum-memoir disguised as a reference book ... fellow fanatics will be delighted." Publishers Weekly)
  • Like many of his literary contemporaries, George Herbert (1593–1633) was a collector of proverbs.
  • Shapiro, a librarian at the Yale Law School, is an attribution hound, as is Ralph Keyes, a quotation specialist and the author of “The Quote Verifier”... Notable Quotables: Is there anything that is not a quotation? By Louis Menand


Pen Names & Users of Pseudonyms
  • literary pen name
  • nom de plume
  • pseudonym
  • Some interesting pseudonyms I've come across over the years: quotegarden-terri.blogspot.com/2016/10/some-old-pen-names.html
  • "Prolific authors like Fanny Crosby (almost one hundred different pseudonyms) and Joyce Carol Oates... took on pseudonyms to bypass critics who complained they published too much." W.G. Regier, Quotology pp.34-35
  • Karen Blixen used pen names in multiple languages.
  • Similar to a pen name, Japanese artists usually have a gō or art-name, which might change a number of times during their career. In some cases, artists adopted different gō at different stages of their career, usually to mark significant changes in their life. [Wikipedia, pen name]
  • Cool book! Initials and Pseudonyms: A Dictionary of Literary Disguises by William Cushing, 1885


To Be Categorized
  • spurious
  • rhetorical antithesis
  • contrapuntal turnaround
  • quotable
  • sound bites
  • How to make big fat curly ornamental quotation marks with HTML code:
    ❝ — ❝
    ❞ — ❞
  • commonplace, n: a notable quotation copied into a commonplace book; archaic: a striking passage entered in a commonplace book; an obvious or trite comment: truism; adj: trite; hackneyed; platitudinous; a well-known, customary, or obvious remark; n: a trite or uninteresting saying; archaic: a place or passage in a book or writing noted as important for reference or quotation; etc.
  • Entire book of mash-up quotations, or centos, (puzzle-style): A Century of Misquotations by Mary B. Dimond, 1906
  • quoted, quotees
  • marks of quotation
  • misquotations
  • collection, passages, excerpts
  • block quotation
  • variations in citing quotations
  • quoting out of context
  • song lyrics
  • "It just shows how this quotation-collecting grips you. You say to yourself that one more — as it might be 'Guard us from error in narration..."
  • "A correspondent, agreeing with me that apposite-quotation collecting has become a contemporary pastime..."
  • "Montaigne opens by disclaiming omniscience... and attacking quotation-collecting..."
  • Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) German literary critic, book collector, quotation collector, man of letters and aesthetician, philosopher, translator, cultural critic. "[L]ike the later notebooks, this collection was not an accumulation of excerpts intended to facilitate the writing of the study but constituted the main work.... The main work consisted in tearing fragments out of their context and arranging them afresh in such a way that they illustrated one another and were able to prove their raison d'être in a free-floating state, as it were. It definitely was a sort of surrealistic montage. Benjamin's ideal of producing a work consisting entirely of quotations, one that was mounted so masterfully that it could dispense with any accompanying text, may strike one as whimsical in the extreme and self-destructive to boot, but it was not..." Hannah Arendt, Men in Dark Times, 1968
  • "It started early with what he himself called his 'bibliomania' but soon extended into something far more characteristic, not so much of the person as of his work: the collecting of quotations. (Not that he ever stopped collecting books..."
  • Gyles Brandreth introduction to Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations, 2013
  • Quotation-related stuff: Criminal Minds (open and close with quotations), Celestial Seasonings (quotes on tea boxes and at facility), Monterey Bay Aquarium (quotes on walls, photo op), Kevin Smith's character Sam in Catch and Release is a quotation dude, the barber in The History of Tom Jones spews proverbs, etc. List photo ops for quotes.
  • Where we can find quotations and other awesome word stuff in the Dewey Decimal Classification: 080, 081, 082, 398.9, 800, 808, 808.8, 808.88, 808.882, 809, 811, 828, and in the Library of Congress Classification 171.Q6, 1992.58, 4784.Q6, 608x, 6403, 6420.
  • See grammar.html page for the quotes about usage of quotation marks.
  • (anthology) selections: classified and arranged
  • Cool title: A Journey Round the Library of A Bibliomaniac: or, Cento of Notes and Reminiscences concerning Rare, Curious, and Valuable Books, by William Davis, 1821
  • guillemet ‎(plural: guillemets): From French guillemet, diminutive form of the name Guillaume ‎(William), after the French typecutter Guillaume Le Bé (1525–1598) who supposedly invented the marks. Aka, duckfoot quote: (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a chevron-shaped quotation mark (« or ») used in Europe. Aka double angle quotation mark. Aka angle quote. Finnish: kulmalainausmerkki. Norwegian: sjevron. Japanese: gyume. Portuguese: aspas angulares. Spanish: comillas latinas, comillas españolas, comillas angulares, comillas bajas. Irish: Liamóg. German: Guillemet. Aka pointing quotation marks.
  • Quotation marks used to be called "inverted commas" or "double inverted commas."
  • aphorism: a bite-sized parable
  • Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, German philosopher and physicist (1742–1799) From 1765 until the end of his life, Lichtenberg kept notebooks he referred to as Sudelbücher, or “waste books,” where he recorded quotations, sketched, and made brief observations on a wide range of subjects from science to philosophy. First published posthumously in 1800–06, they became his best-known work and gave him his reputation as an aphorist. Selections from the Sudelbücher were published in English as The Waste Books (2000). [Encyclopædia Britannica] ⁂ It is by his "Miscellaneous Reflections" that Lichtenberg is now chiefly popular. These form a posthumous work — a hotchpotch of aphorisms, thoughts, criticisms, witticisms, and the like. A certain semblance of order has been given them by their successive editors, but arbitrarily, as in the original noteboks all is pell-mell in Lichtenberg's usual manner; indeed, he himself, borrowing a commercial term from the English, used to call these manuscripts his "wastebooks," or books in which rough entries of transactions are made, previous to their being carried into the journal.... As a master of style Lichtenberg takes high rank. He wrote clearly, simply, and naturally. He used common words. [Norman Alliston, 1908]
  • Aphorism: a little window with a big view. (James Lough)
  • Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (1849–1912) was an English painter. His career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, of whose manuscripts and memorabilia he built up a substantial collection... [I just love that name, Pen!]
  • Gottlieb Wilhelm Rabener's satiric 1743 book Hinkmars von Repkow Noten ohne Text (Notes without Text) reasoned that since scholars acquire their cultural capital through footnotes that explicate other works rather than through writing primary works themselves, a book with only footnotes would be the fastest route to scholarly success. [Craig Douglas Dworkin, No Medium]
  • "The arts and rites of cultivating others' words and voices are thus varied indeed. Some flowers are carefully tended, grown in well bordered plots, consciously admired and labelled in their differentiated species. Others spring up in more mixed form, less deliberately gardened or recognised but admired in their profusions of colours." ~Ruth Finnegan, "Arts and Rites of Quoting: How do the thousand flowers grow and who savours them?" Why Do We Quote?: The Culture and History of Quotation, 2011
  • After reading Willis Goth Regier's Quotology, I realized that I am a self-taught quotologist. But then again, really, are there any schools or classes for such a thing?
  • In forming this bouquet, however, a view has been had to the selection of as many poetical flowers from comparatively unknown sources as possible..." ~The Lyre: Fugitive Poetry of the XIXth Century, 1830
  • Quite a bit of quoting poetry going on in Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Mucker / The Return of the Mucker, 1916. Even a couple of lines in the book about quoting. "The camper quoted snatches from Service and Kipling, then he came back to Knibbs, who was evidently his favorite." "Because one man speaks better English than another, or has read more and remembers it, only makes him a better man in that particular respect. I think none the less of you because you can't quote Browning or Shakespeare—the thing that counts is that you can appreciate, as I do, Service and Kipling and Knibbs."
  • James Joyce insisted on using dashes rather than quotation marks.
  • "misquotations" in Spanish (Mexican): citas equivocadas
  • The Rose, The Shamrock, and The Thistle (a magazine), "the most unexpected of all enterprises—a Magazine printed by Women" (Edinburgh, London, Dublin, 1800s)
  • Fun fact: Louisa May Alcott had a pet fly named Buzzy (1868)
  • Novels based on proverbs, called The Proverb Series. E.g., Actions Speak Louder Than Words by Kate J. Neeley, 1870. A Wrong Confessed Is Half Redressed by Mrs. Bradley, 1870. One Good Turn Deserves Another by Kate J. Neely, 1870.
  • The Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure, containing: News, Letters, Debates, Poetry, Musick, Biography, History, Geography, Voyages, Criticism, Translations, Philosophy, Mathematicks, Husbandry, Gardening, Cookery, Chemistry, Mechanicks, Trade, Navigation, Architecture, and Other Arts and Sciences, Which may render it Instructive and Entertaining to Gentry, Merchants, Farmers and Tradesmen, To which occassionally will be added An Impartial Account of Books in several Languages and of the State of Learning in Europe, also of the Stage, New Operas, Plays and Oratorios (London, 1700s)
  • Under contruction, lots more info and examples coming to this page soon!




Page Information:
http://www.quotegarden.com/quotation-awesomeness.html
Last modified 2017 Jan 19 Thu 08:11 PST


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